A civil society member holds a placard to protest against the attack on Bacha Khan University at a demonstration in Islamabad
A civil society member holds a placard to protest against the attack on Bacha Khan University at a demonstration in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 21, 2016. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood – RTX23FYW

In this chapter, following Stiegler and Derrida, I consider the relationship between the transformations taking place in hyperindustrial societies and the academy, and the nature of academic work as a form of otium that is responsible to, and conditioned by the pharmacology of the civil society. The university must recognise and fulfil its inherent responsibility of engaging with the spiritual crisis of Western industrial societies by being committed to, and intervening in, the transitional objects emerging from the general organology of the civil society: for instance, digital tertiary retentions and social movements.

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